Push email now available in iOS Mail

While our own app has had push notifications for some time, with the built-in Mail app you would have to wait until it next decided to check the server for your new messages. But no more! From today, new mail will be pushed straight to your inbox. Never again will you only learn of that important new cat GIF from your Dad fifteen minutes after everyone else.

Amazed cat

We’ve enabled Push IMAP for all accounts and it will activate automatically; you don’t need to do anything. If you haven’t set up your mail on your iPhone yet, follow these step-by-step instructions to get started.

Many thanks to our friends on the Apple mail teams for helping make this possible.

Posted in Feature announcement, News. Comments Off on Push email now available in iOS Mail

IMAP Notes beta service is here

We are pleased to announce that our IMAP Notes service is being released into public beta test today.

IMAP Notes joins our recently released CalDAV offering, which along with traditional IMAP and our mobile apps help to bring FastMail to your mobile device.

Notes has been a FastMail feature for a while now, and we have also supported adding Notes via Apple iOS and Mac OS devices backed by standard IMAP. We are happy to bring these two services together with the beta release of IMAP Notes.

Notes saved in the FastMail web interface will be available via Apple devices and vice-versa. Android users will require a suitable third-party app.

Of course, being a beta there are a few things you should know before clicking the opt-in button.

Rich media notes created in Apple clients are not fully supported; any note with an attached image will not be editable.
Folders are not supported, only notes in the root Notes folder will be displayed.
The backend is yet to be fully tested under heavy load or with unusual data formats

During the beta period we’re monitoring the system closely and will be fixing things quickly as they come up. You can also help by emailing us with any comments, questions or problems.

So now all the disclaimers are out of the way, you can sign up for the IMAP Notes beta here:
https://www.fastmail.com/go/imapnotesbeta

Instructions for connecting your client are here:
https://www.fastmail.com/help/clients/applist.html

Details of the notes service are here:
https://www.fastmail.com/help/notes/usage.html

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Handle your email faster with our updated Android app

We’ve just released an update to our Android update that has some great new features to help you fly through your email.

First up, we’ve replaced the old “inbox” notification for multiple new messages with a new notification “stack”. Previously if you had multiple new messages, the notification would show a list of senders and subjects, but you couldn’t take any useful action except open the full app. Now the app will show a notification for the latest message, complete with avatar, subject and body preview and you can use the full set of actions on it. Once an action is taken, a new notification appears for the next unread message and so on for the entire stack. In this way you can quickly triage your new mail without leaving your notification tray. Of course, you can still tap on any notification to open it in the app or swipe to remove the entire stack.

Being able to quickly delete, archive or pin a message is great, but sometimes an email will arrive that you can actually deal with with a simple short reply. Notifications now have a “reply” action that will let you write a quick one-line reply without opening the full app. Even better, if you have an Android Wear smartwatch (or a compatible device, such as a Pebble), you can reply directly using the speech recognition feature.

This release also includes a few critical performance improvements, including a fix for the long-standing restart delay.

The updated Android app is now rolling out via Google Play and the Amazon Appstore and should be available on your device within the next day or two.

We’ve had a great time building and testing this update and would love to hear what you think! Please let us know via support or Twitter.

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FastMail supports Roundcube Next development

FastMail have always been a strong supporter of open source and open standards. We retain customers by providing an excellent, reliable service which is great value for money — not by locking them into our platform.

At The Kolab Summit we had an opportunity to meet like-minded developers from the Roundcube project, the most popular open source webmail client in the world.

FastMail is already investing heavily in open source email with our server-side work on Cyrus IMAPd, currently employing three developers, a writer, and a tester for the project.

We have also been preparing the fully open JMAP protocol to replace our current custom web API, with another two developers working on JMAP client and server code.

To safeguard a future where protocols are open, and interoperability doesn’t mean speaking both the protocol of Vendor A and of Vendor B, the world needs freely available, modern email software. We believe the Roundcube team are the right people to build one of those clients. We are helping them by offering code for the data model from our own incredibly fast (video) web interface, assistance with JMAP compatibility, and a contribution of US $10,000 towards the Roundcube Next Indiegogo campaign.

If you care about open email/contacts/calendaring software and protocols, we encourage you to support their campaign as well.

We are also assisting the Thunderbird project and their Summer of Code student Suyash to add JMAP support to Thunderbird, the world’s most popular open source desktop client.

You can follow JMAP progress by reading the discussion group and join in with testing, documentation, or development.

The future of open source email, calendar and contacts has never looked brighter! Here’s to great collaboration this year.

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CardDAV beta for FastMail business and family accounts is here

At the end of last year, we talked about our initial release of CardDAV support into public beta test.

We’re now pleased to announce the next stage of our CardDAV beta release has launched. While previously only available for FastMail personal accounts, we’ve now extended this beta release as an opt-in for FastMail business and family accounts, with a full production release not far off!

Just to quickly recap: CardDAV is an internet protocol for reading, writing and synchronising contact data. It’s already on iOS devices and available as an app for Android. Basically, if you’ve ever wanted to have your FastMail contacts available on your mobile device (and vice-versa), then CardDAV is the answer.

With this ‘cross-device syncing’, CardDAV essentially pulls down contacts from the web server, makes any changes from your mobile device and then copies these back up into the server. With CardDAV syncing all your contacts, it’s much easier to access and manage contacts across all the devices you use to access your FastMail accounts.

Start using CardDAV

If you have a FastMail personal, business or family account, then you can start using CardDAV here.

At the moment CardDAV is only available to Full account levels and higher for personal and family accounts, and Standard and higher for business accounts. Member, Guest and Lite accounts will need to upgrade to be able to use the CardDAV feature.

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FastMail at the openSUSE conference and Kolab Summit

I was fortunate enough to recently attend – and speak – at both the 2015 openSUSE Conference and Kolab Summit in The Hague.

IMG_20150504_111406

As one of the team working on the open source Cyrus email technology, this was a great opportunity to meet with fellow developers and email administrators. Initially developed by Carnegie Mellon University, the Cyrus server has always been freely available as open source software.  It has been at the core of FastMail’s service since we started, and is also an important component of Kolab’s groupware.

The Cyrus project is a great collaborative team including staff from Carnegie Mellon University, Kolab, Netmail, OpenIO and of course FastMail plus awesome volunteers from all around the globe. We’re committed to keeping Cyrus entirely open source, and welcome new contributors – both volunteers and companies offering staff time for development and integration. Contact us on our mailing lists (cyrus and jmap) if you want to help!

Even though we are competitors to a certain degree, FastMail shares many values with Kolab – building great software, providing the best experience to our users, and giving back to the community. I was asked during the Advent Calendar blog post series last year if we were giving away too much of our “secret sauce” – my answer was that there’s nothing super-secret about running a good email service, just a ton of hard work. To underline our cooperation, FastMail assisted the Kolab conference as a key sponsor.

IMG_20150501_091803

My first talk focused on the history of Cyrus up until now and our plans for the future, starting with a major new release at OSCON in Portland on July 21st of this year.

My second talk at the openSUSE conference was about the JMAP protocol, and the foundation that we are forming to support the open source development project (video available). While preparing the talk, I snipped out the two video clips from the video at jmap.io. I realised that they are even more powerful in isolation, showing just how fast email can be with a protocol designed from the ground up for speed and efficiency.


Server side pre-calculation plus intelligent use of SSDs.

Instant sync including messages, counts and entire mailbox state in a single update with push technology.

So I included both clips in my talk! By this stage I also knew what the major announcement of the conferences was going to be. Roundcube, the most popular open-source web email client, is starting a project to update their code.  They are running a crowdfunding push to fund development.  I’ve already pitched in personally!  FastMail is also going to assist with both funding and code contribution.

Looking to the future, we want Cyrus to be usable and scalable beyond simple systems. And while open source software is absolutely essential to the future of the software industry, for it to truly succeed it needs great products to be developed. Our ultimate goal is to make Cyrus a great product to install and run, with a protocol which allows brilliant clients to be developed.

Which leads neatly to JMAP. JMAP has been developed as a replacement for existing protocols such as IMAP, SMTP Submission, CalDAV and CardDAV. The JMAP protocol is totally open and unencumbered and leverages existing standards like HTTP, JSON and native push channels, making it easier for developers to work with, so much so that Roundcube are planning to use it as the core of their new client/server protocol. In short, JMAP and Cyrus together are a great combination – a fully open and very efficient server with a fully open and very efficient protocol!

With openSUSE and the Kolab Summit being held together, it was great to meet and share ideas with so many other people working in the same space. I also saw a ton of interesting talks and even snuck upstairs and joined a BodyPump class (the conferences were held in a fitness centre) I also got a chance to travel for a few days after the conference and meet some other companies working in the email space, as well as inspect our new Amsterdam datacentre (we’ll talk more about this in a later blog post).

I’m really excited about the future of email, and looking forward to building it together. Feel free to join the mailing lists for cyrus and jmap and get involved!

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FastMail is not required to implement the Australian metadata retention laws

Summary: We have reviewed the recently passed Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Amendment (Data Retention) Bill 2015 and have received additional legal advice confirming that the new metadata retention regime will not apply to FastMail. This means that FastMail is not obligated to retain metadata relating to email sent/received by our users, nor are we required to provide Australian law enforcement agencies with access to such metadata without a warrant. As such, there are no changes to our privacy policy.

For those interested, there are significantly more details below.


Some users have asked us what the recently passed metadata retention laws mean for FastMail, and in particular the privacy of their data. We’ve now reviewed the new laws as passed in the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Amendment (Data Retention) Bill 2015 and worked with a lawyer to get a confirmed interpretation.

The most important provision in the Bill for our purposes is the new section 187A(3) which defines who the laws actually apply to. There are 3 separate parts that must all apply for an entity to be subject to the metadata retention requirements. Quoting the actual bill:

(3) This Part applies to a service if:

   (a) it is a service for carrying communications, or enabling communications to be carried, by means of guided or unguided electromagnetic energy or both; and

   (b) it is a service:

      (i) operated by a carrier; or

      (ii) operated by an internet service provider (within the meaning of Schedule 5 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992); or

      (iii) of a kind for which a declaration under subsection (3A) is in force; and

   (c) the person operating the service owns or operates, in Australia, infrastructure that enables the provision of any of its relevant services;

but does not apply to a broadcasting service (within the meaning of the Broadcasting Services Act 1992).

We do meet the requirements for (a), however none of (b) nor (c) apply to us, so the laws as a whole to not apply to us.

Digging into these into more detail:

Section 187(3)(a)

As an email service, FastMail clearly enables "communications" to be "carried" (as those two terms are defined in the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979 ("TIAA").

Section 187(3)(b)

(i) FastMail is not a "carrier" as defined in section 5 the TIAA because:

  • we are not the holder of a "carrier licence" as defined in section 7 of the Telecommunications Act 1997 ("TA"); and
  • we are not a "carriage service provider" as defined in section 87 of the TA because:
    • the definitions in sections 87(1), (2), (4) and (5) require a carriage service provider to be a person supplying a "listed carriage service", which is defined in section 16 of the TA to mean a "carriage service" between two or more points where at least one point is in Australia – as none of FastMail’s servers are physically in Australia, we only ever connect our servers to a network outside of Australia, and therefore only ever carry communications between non-Australian locations;
    • the definition in section 87(3) applies to carriage services that are supplied as a secondary purpose for a network whose principal use is by a defence organisation, transport or electricity providers, or similar – none of these uses are relevant to FastMail’s services;

(ii) FastMail is not an "internet service provider" within the meaning of Schedule 5 to the Broadcasting Services Act 1992, because we do not supply an "internet carriage service" (meaning a listed carriage service (as defined in the TA) that enables end-users to access the internet) to the public; and

(iii) no declarations made under subsection (3A) are in force.

Although the argument regarding FastMail only ever carrying communications between non-Australian networks is quite technical, we’ve not been able to find any cases or commentary which support nor contradict that argument. However, having reviewed the rest of the wording in section 87 (including the definitions of "network unit", "line link", "line" and "designated radiocommunications facility", none of which FastMail seem to have in Australia), it seems unlikely that FastMail could be defined at a "carriage service provider".

In any event, an analysis of part (c) as discussed below, it’s of little consequence whether 3(b) applies or not.

Section 187(3)(c)

The biggest question here is what "infrastructure" means. Section 5 of the TIAA (see page 29 of the Bill) includes a definition as follows:

infrastructure means any line or equipment used to facilitate communications across a telecommunications network

We don’t have any lines or equipment (servers) in Australia, and therefore do not have "infrastructure" in Australia.

As an additional confirmation, the explanatory memorandum for the Bill makes this point even clearer:

Definition of ‘infrastructure’

417.           This item inserts a definition for the term infrastructure into subsection 5(1) of the TIA Act. It defines infrastructure, as it is used in paragraph 187A(3)(c), to mean any line or equipment used to facilitate communications across a telecommunications network.

418.           The term infrastructure is used as part of the three limb test in paragraphs 187A(3)(a), (b) and (c) which defines a relevant service. ‘Equipment’ is defined in section 5 of the Act, which states equipment means any apparatus or equipment used, or intended for use, in or in connection with a telecommunications network, and includes a telecommunications device but does not include a line. Section 5 of the Act, defines ‘line’ by reference to the definition in the Telecommunications Act. Section 7 of the Telecommunications Act states a line is a wire, cable, optical fibre, tube, conduit, waveguide or other physical medium used, or for use, as a continuous artificial guide for or in connection with carrying communications by means of guided electromagnetic energy.

419.           Servers used to operate an ‘over the top’ service such as VoIP would fall within the definition of infrastructure. However, ‘infrastructure’ is not intended to include business premises. For example the headquarters of a company, taken in isolation, would not satisfy the definition of ‘infrastructure.’

420.           Importantly, a piece of equipment or line meeting the definition of infrastructure does not automatically satisfy paragraph 187(3)(c). For instance, a computer used by an employee in a company’s headquarters or marketing office is not directly involved in the provision of a relevant service and therefore does not satisfy paragraph 187(3)(c).

421.           This item implements recommendation 11 of the 2015 PJCIS Report by defining the term ‘infrastructure’ in greater detail for the purposes of paragraph 187A(3)(c).

Therefore, it’s clear that part (c) does not apply to FastMail, as the only equipment in Australia is employees and their work computers, there are no servers running any FastMail services or storing any email in Australia.

Therefore section 187A(3), which imposes the metadata retention obligations, does not apply to FastMail.

We had some additional queries regarding the wording of “owns or operates, in Australia”. Since that’s two separate parts, if you take the "own in Australia" part, does that mean "the infrastructure is physically in Australia" or does it mean "the infrastructure is legally owned by an entity in Australia"? It has been made clear to us that the wording of part (c) of section 287(3) applies to the location of the infrastructure, rather than whether the person or entity that owns the infrastructure is Australian. If this wasn’t the case, part (c) would need to phrased so that the reference was to an "Australian person" or "Australian entity" owning infrastructure (or there’d be a definition to bring in this connection). By using the words "in Australia", the reference can only be to the physical location of the lines and equipment

As an aside from actually determining if the law applies to us, we regard the actual need for this law as poorly thought out. There’s no evidence that large scale metadata retention will actually lead to improved policing, and in an insane situation, you actually have the communications minister for the government that’s passing this law recommending ways to work around the law! All this bill does is impose excessive additional regulations and burdens on Australian businesses. It actively discourages us from investing in servers and infrastructure in Australia and encourages us to put them elsewhere in the world to ensure that the law continues to not apply to us. Forcing an Australian company to reduce IT infrastructure investment in Australia and creating an inferior experience for Australian customers, while providing no proven law enforcement benefit for anyone feels like a massive mistake to us.

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