About our first fastmail.com customer

Since we rolled out our new fastmail.com domain last week, we’ve had 10,000’s of users use the domain to rename, signup and create aliases.

We decided to have a quick look through our logs and find the first customer to use fastmail.com and ask them a few questions about themselves and FastMail. Thanks for taking some time out to answer questions for us Joe D!


What country & city do you live in?

Newcastle, Australia

What do you do for a living?

I’m a software developer at a services company for the mining and energy industries in Australia.

How long have you used FastMail?

I signed up to FastMail when I was in high school, back in 2002. I’ve been pretty happy since then. My home address changes more often than my email address.

How did you find out about FastMail?

It was so long ago, I honestly don’t remember!

Why do you use FastMail?

I love FastMail for the power-user features. I like being able to set up Personalities to send from different email addresses, and being able to control every aspect of my email filtering through Sieve scripts. Plus I seem to get way less spam than at addresses I’ve tried at other providers.

What domain was your previous FastMail address at?

I have a few addresses on the mailbolt.com domain, which I’ll continue to use for certain things like store memberships, news subscriptions, banking and bills. I also have a "junk" address on this domain, since every website and his dog requires you to sign up and provide an email address these days.

Why did you want a fastmail.com address?

It’s nice and simple. It looks great written, and I can tell it to someone over the phone without having to repeat bits of it.

Were you actively waiting for the opening up of fastmail.com on the day?

I’m a little embarrassed to admit I had some help on this one. I had a program monitoring the FastMail website for the exact moment fastmail.com became available, so that I could register my address straight away. Is this taking email too seriously?

Do you plan to use your new @fastmail.com address as your primary address? Have you told people about it yet?

It’ll be my new personal address to give out to people online and in person. I’ve only told a few people so far, but it will get more and more use over time.


We’ve sent Joe a T-Shirt from our RedBubble store for his time.

Of course there’s always going to be a rush for the most popular names, so we hope everyone managed to get the fastmail.com address they wanted. If not, remember you can also signup your own domain (personally, we use gandi.net) and use that for receiving email (Enhanced or higher personal accounts, or any Family/Business accounts required).

Thanks for reading

The FastMail Team

FastMail has moved to fastmail.com, @fastmail.com email addresses now available

As discussed in a blog post earlier this week, we’ve now moved FastMail to fastmail.com. This means when you go to https://www.fastmail.fm, you’ll immediately be redirected to https://www.fastmail.com.

Does this affect my existing address or aliases?

Not at all, they will continue to function exactly as before. The only difference is the web address you’ll see in your browser when you log in to our website. This applies to all domains we host, not just @fastmail.fm.

How can I get an @fastmail.com email address?

With the exception of legacy guest and member accounts, you can add an alias (additional address) to your account, or you can rename your account to a new username @fastmail.com right now. Just go to https://www.fastmail.com, login to your account and go to Advanced -> Aliases to add an alias, or Advanced -> Rename account to rename your account.

All addresses are available on a first come, first served basis. We decided on this approach because we already offer many domains, so there might be joeblogs@fastmail.fm, joeblogs@fastmail.us, joeblogs@fastmail.net, joeblogs@myfastmail.com, joeblogs@eml.cc, etc. and we don’t think any particular user and any particular domain should get priority over another.

In the interests of fairness, we are only allowing each account to register one alias @fastmail.com. New users will be able to sign up an address @fastmail.com as well.

Email client users (e.g. Thunderbird, Apple Mail, Outlook, etc)

If you access your email through an email client, there’s no change. Everything will continue to work exactly as before.

beta.fastmail.fm now redirects to beta.fastmail.com

In preparation for our our move to fastmail.com, we’ll be doing some testing on beta.fastmail.fm. So if you use the beta server, expect some changes and potential issues over the next few days.

Currently that means if you go to beta.fastmail.fm, you’ll immediately be redirected to https://beta.fastmail.com. This is expected. Note that you can’t currently create @fastmail.com aliases or rename your account to @fastmail.com. This is expected. This will only be available from Thursday as described in the original blog post.

FastMail is moving to fastmail.com

On Thursday, 23rd October 2014, we are moving the main FastMail website from fastmail.fm to fastmail.com. We intend to make the transition as seamless as possible, but we wanted to give you advance warning. Below are some more details for users regarding this change:

Email client users (e.g. Thunderbird, Apple Mail, Outlook, etc)

If you access your email through an email client, there’s no change. Everything will continue to work exactly as before.

Web interface users

If you use our web interface, from Thursday when you go to fastmail.fm you will be redirected automatically to fastmail.com. Any existing sessions will be transferred across, so if you were logged in at fastmail.fm, you’ll be logged in at fastmail.com. The only difference you should see is in the address bar in your browser.

Password manager users

If your password is normally filled in automatically for you by your browser or password manager, you’ll need to make sure you know what it is. For security reasons most password managers will only fill in your password on the domain where it was first used, and since we’re moving domains from fastmail.fm to fastmail.com, they’ll fail to work automatically. If you don’t know what your password is, we’ve got instructions on how to find it in all major browsers. Your password manager should prompt to save it again the first time you log in at fastmail.com, so don’t worry, you still won’t have to memorise it!

Does this affect my @fastmail.fm email address?

Not at all, this will continue to function exactly as before. The only difference is the web address you’ll see in your browser when you log in to our website.

How can I get an @fastmail.com email address?

With the exception of legacy guest and member accounts, you will be able to add an alias (additional address) to your account, or you will be able to rename your account to a new username @fastmail.com.

In the interests of fairness, we are only allowing each account to register one alias @fastmail.com. New users will be able to sign up an address @fastmail.com as well. All addresses will be available on a first come, first served basis, starting as soon as the transition to fastmail.com occurs.

When exactly will @fastmail.com email addresses become available?

An exact time on Thursday hasn’t been decided yet. Please keep an eye on this blog for further details.

SSL 3.0 disabled due to security vulnerability

This morning Google published news of a new vulnerability in SSL 3.0. You can read more about it in the original announcement and in CloudFlare’s analysis of the problem.

This is a serious issue that can leak user data. Unfortunately there’s no workaround – the only option we have is to disable SSL 3.0 on our servers entirely. We don’t like having to do this because we want our users to be able to use any client they choose to access their mail, but when there’s a security hole and no way to plug it we have no choice but to break things for some people in order to protect everyone.

Happily, this should not affect the majority of our users. The only significant browser to be affected is Internet Explorer 6 on Windows XP, which will now not be able to connect to www.fastmail.fm at all. Similar changes have been made to our IMAP, POP and other backend services, so you may also have connection issues with older mail clients.

If you are unable or unwilling to upgrade your client software at this time, you can use insecure.fastmail.fm (web) and insecure.messagingengine.com (IMAP/POP/SMTP), both of which support SSL 3.0. As always, we highly discourage the use of these service names because they leave your data open to attack, and we may remove them in the future.

Update 16 Oct 2014 01:00 UTC: We’ve heard of at least two mail clients (Airmail and Windows Phone) that can receive but not send mail. Changing the outgoing settings to use port 587 instead of 465 has resolved the problem for some users. If you’re seeing similar problems, give that a try.

Posted in Technical. Comments Off

New anti-phishing feature, all official FastMail emails have green tick mark

We’ve just rolled out a new feature that should help users identify official FastMail emails and avoid fake phishing emails.

All future official FastMail emails should now have a green tick next to them in the mailbox listing and when viewing the email/conversation. They look like this:

Screen Shot 2014-10-14 at 10.14.37 pm

Screen Shot 2014-10-14 at 10.17.52 pm

Users should be careful of any future emails that claim to be from FastMail that don’t have the green tick. These are almost certainly phishing emails that aim to steal your login details. Just report them as spam.

Note that the tick will only appear on future official FastMail emails, not existing ones. Also it only appears in the current web interface, not the classic web interface and not in external email clients (e.g. Outlook, Thunderbird, Mac Mail, etc)

Posted in News. Comments Off

FastMail changelog update

The following changes have been rolled out to production:

  • When you use FastMail’s nameservers for your DNS, one of the default records we publish is an SPF
    record. Until now, we’ve published this as a TXT DNS record type and a SPF DNS record type type.
  • SPF DNS record types have been deprecated (http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7208#section-3.1) for a while, so we’ve now removed the SPF DNS record type and are only publishing TXT DNS records types.
  • This shouldn’t affect anyone, but we’ve put up this post as informational for anyone experiencing some
    issue with ancient software or systems.
Posted in Feature announcement. Comments Off
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